Pet CPR on the Road

CPR for your Pets: Emergencies can happen anywhere!

Skills of the people present can make the difference in a pet’s outcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • One of the first aid skills we are going to learn today is pet CPR for dogs and cats.
  • Check ABC’s.
  • Airway – open, or obstructed, clear it out.
  • Check pet for Breathing on his own.
  • Check for any signs of CIrculation (heartbeat) – can feel heart in small animals, can feel for pulse in femoral artery of larger pets. Practice this and get good at finding the pulse.
  • Start chest compressions.
  • Begin mouth to snout.
  • Do these things en route to the hospital (while someone else drives), if possible. No EMTs can be called like for humans.
  • Next Week on Tails from the Road: Fostering Good Relationship with Your Veterinarian
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    TFTR Episode CPR

    “Stayin’ Alive” is more than a song by the Bee Gee’s. Come learn and important first aid skill at Tails From the Road, next.

    Intro

    Emergency can happen anywhere. Just like in people, it is sometimes the people present directly at the problem that can make the difference in a pet’s outcome.

    One of the first aid skills we are going to learn today is pet CPR for dogs and cats.

    A few things to know ahead of time:

    Sudden cardiac arrest is not nearly as common in dogs and cats as it is in people because there really is no significant coronary artery disease in our pets like there is in people. When it happens, it is usually more like the young athlete you hear about, that may have an underlying structural or electrical problem.

    May be respiratory arrest, like with an underlying illness, conformation, or heartworm.

    Survival rates are low, like they are in people, and are NOT like what they are on TV. We still need to know this important skill because there is always a chance.

     

    1. Check ABC’s.

    Airway – open, or obstructed, clear it out.

    Check pet for Breathing on his own.

    Check for any signs of CIrculation (heartbeat) – can feel heart in small animals, can feel for pulse in femoral artery of larger pets. Practice this and get good at finding the pulse.

     

    2. Start chest compressions. (see dog and cat CPR pics)

    Blood gas good for about 4 minutes.

    Quality of chest compressions critical as even ideal chest compressions only gives about 25-30% of regular cardiac output.

    100-120 bpm – the BeeGees “Atayin’ Alive is 103, The Stars and Stripes Forever is 120.

    Side of chest, deep chested breeds go nearer armpit, barrel chested breeds go on back and at aternum like a human

    3. Begin mouth to snout – difficult to get enough tidal volume into a big dog chest, so heave ho on the big ones. Think infant on the small pets. Use your hand to cup around the snout, don’t put your mouth directly on the nose. Straighten out neck a bit to help with air flow.

    4. Do these things en route to the hospital (while someone else drives), if possible. No EMTs can be called like for humans.